Month: September 2016

Diocesan Convention, Oct 21–22, 2016

Date:   Friday, October 21 – Saturday, October 22, 2016

Time:   Friday, 10:30 AM – 6:30 PM, with banquet following; Saturday 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM

Location:   Hilton Seattle Airport & Convention Center


The 2016 annual convention will be held Friday-Saturday, October 21-22, at the Hilton Seattle Airport & Conference Center, 17620 International Blvd, Seattle, WA, 98188.

The Diocese of Olympia Convention meets annually to conduct the business of the diocese. It elects to diocesan offices; ratifies a budget; sets assessment levels; admits congregations as missions or parishes; votes on resolutions; elects a General Convention deputation; and hears the bishop’s annual address. Clergy and elected delegates from congregations attend. Convention information is distributed via newsletter and this webpage; bookmark and check-back often for updates.

Film Screening: Budrus, Oct 22, 2016

From our friends at JVP-Seattle.


September 28, 2016

Hello Friends of JVP-Seattle!

In collaboration with Muslim Association of Puget SoundMuslim Community Resource Center, we are excited to invite you to join us for a film screening and short facilitated discussion about the Boycott, Divestment, & Sanctions Movement in support of Palestinian liberation.

Budrus tells a story of Palestinian community organizers, with the support of Israeli and international activists, nonviolently resisting the destruction of their village by Israel’s Separation Barrier.

Date:   Saturday, October 22, 2016
Time:   1:30–4:00 PM
Location:   Muslim Association of Puget Sound, 17550 NE 67th Ct, Redmond, WA 98052
Cost:   Free

To guarantee a seat, please register in advance. (Walk-ins welcome if space allows.)

Wheelchair accessible. Rideshare board here. For more information contact sarahzareen@gmail.com.

This screening is a collaborative project presented by Muslim Association of Puget Sound – Muslim Community Resource Center (MAPS-MCRC), and Jewish Voice for Peace – Seattle (JVP).

Hope to see you there!

California AB2844

We received this letter from our friends at JVP Los Angeles.


September 26, 2016

Friends,

As you have likely heard, over the weekend Gov. Jerry Brown signed California anti-BDS bill AB 2844 into law. As our coalition looks at next steps, it would be good to know if any church groups here in California have chosen to boycott or divest believe they will/might be affected by this legislation which bars persons (but legally includes entities) from applying or renewing contracts for over $100,000 if they have a “policy” “against any sovereign nation or peoples recognized by the government of the United States, including, but not limited to, the nation and people of Israel.”

Thank you to all who engaged in the long and collaborative effort to block this bill from becoming law. My personal frustration with our governor’s decision does not overwhelm my gratitude to all of you and those in our broad coalition for the hours, days, weeks and months we joined together to fight this good fight.

I believe legislators should pay attention to the growing number of constituents who actively work to raise Palestinian rights as we do the rights of all oppressed people and minority groups. All who voted to support this misguided and dishonest legislation will find themselves on the wrong side of history.

Let’s stay focused and steadfast as Palestinians are. The arc of the moral universe is long.

— Estee Chandler
JVP-LA Organizer

“Our ambitions must be broad enough to include the aspirations and needs of others, for their sakes and for our own.” — Cesar Chavez

Islam in the Public Square

Date: Saturday, October 29, 2016
Time: 9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Location: Town Hall Seattle
Cost: $15.00 (includes lunch)
Students free!
Questions: Email us

Dear Friends,

Please join us for a one-day conference on Islam in America, Islam in the Public Square, on Saturday, October 29, 2016, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., at Town Hall Seattle.

Islam in the Public Square is a gathering of local area leaders to examine the dynamics that have led to the gap in understanding about this religious tradition. We will discuss the many issues clouding the image of Islam and Muslims in America. The conversation will seek to build understanding and tolerance across ethnic and faith lines, and look into ways all of us can confront and overcome the misunderstandings and fears that divide us. Together, as one Seattle community, we will explore ways to work together for peace and justice.

Background:

Muslim Americans have been part of the American narrative since our country’s foundation. They have settled in every state, fought in every war and contributed to the diversity that has made America strong. While many minority groups have been embraced and their traditions honored in the public square, Muslims continue to struggle to have their voices heard. The average American has little understanding of the positive contributions of Islam over the centuries to societies worldwide and to America at home. In fact, one out of two Americans holds negative views of Muslims and Islam. A recent Pew survey revealed that only 35% of Americans know a Muslim. More recently, criminal acts of extremists together with hateful rhetoric by certain pundits and electoral candidates have contributed to record high levels of anti-Muslim hate crimes and bullying of children nationwide.

Speakers:

Schedule:

8:30 a.m. Doors Open — Coffee available
9:00 a.m. Introductions — Randolph Urmston
Welcome — Rt. Rev. Gregory Rickel
9:15 a.m. Keynote Speakers: “Understanding Islam and Our Muslim Neighbor”
• Mohamed Jawad Khaki — Ithna-asheri Muslim Association Northwest (IMAN)
• Mahmood Khadeeer — Muslim Association of Puget Sound (MAPS)
• Varisha Khan — University of Washington
• Mark Markuly, PhD — Seattle University School of Theology
• Randolph Urmston, (moderator)
10:30 a.m. Coffee Break
11:00 a.m. Breakout Session
12:15 p.m. Lunch and Prayer
1:15 p.m. Panel Discussion
• Aneelah Afzali — Attorney
• Mahmood Khadeeer — Muslim Association of Puget Sound (MAPS)
• Mohamed Jawad Khaki — Ithna-asheri Muslim Association Northwest (IMAN)
• Varisha Khan — University of Washington
• Mark Markuly, PhD — Seattle University School of Theology
• Phillip Ginsberg, (moderator)
2:45 p.m. Short Break
3:00 p.m. Film: “Confronting Stereotypes”
3:15 p.m. Breakout Session: “Walking Together”
4:00 p.m. Conclusion

Sponsors:

Questions: If you have any questions, please email us here.

The Clash of Ignorance

Labels like “Islam” and “the West” serve only to confuse us about a disorderly reality.

This classic article by Edward W. Said, originally published in The Nation on October 4, 2011, is worthy of a fresh reading.


Samuel Huntington’s article “The Clash of Civilizations?” appeared in the Summer 1993 issue of Foreign Affairs, where it immediately attracted a surprising amount of attention and reaction. Because the article was intended to supply Americans with an original thesis about “a new phase” in world politics after the end of the cold war, Huntington’s terms of argument seemed compellingly large, bold, even visionary. He very clearly had his eye on rivals in the policy-making ranks, theorists such as Francis Fukuyama and his “end of history” ideas, as well as the legions who had celebrated the onset of globalism, tribalism and the dissipation of the state. But they, he allowed, had understood only some aspects of this new period. He was about to announce the “crucial, indeed a central, aspect” of what “global politics is likely to be in the coming years.” Unhesitatingly he pressed on:

“It is my hypothesis that the fundamental source of conflict in this new world will not be primarily ideological or primarily economic. The great divisions among humankind and the dominating source of conflict will be cultural. Nation states will remain the most powerful actors in world affairs, but the principal conflicts of global politics will occur between nations and groups of different civilizations. The clash of civilizations will dominate global politics. The fault lines between civilizations will be the battle lines of the future.”

Most of the argument in the pages that followed relied on a vague notion of something Huntington called “civilization identity” and “the interactions among seven or eight [sic] major civilizations,” of which the conflict between two of them, Islam and the West, gets the lion’s share of his attention. In this belligerent kind of thought, he relies heavily on a 1990 article by the veteran Orientalist Bernard Lewis, whose ideological colors are manifest in its title, “The Roots of Muslim Rage.” In both articles, the personification of enormous entities called “the West” and “Islam” is recklessly affirmed, as if hugely complicated matters like identity and culture existed in a cartoonlike world where Popeye and Bluto bash each other mercilessly, with one always more virtuous pugilist getting the upper hand over his adversary. Certainly neither Huntington nor Lewis has much time to spare for the internal dynamics and plurality of every civilization, or for the fact that the major contest in most modern cultures concerns the definition or interpretation of each culture, or for the unattractive possibility that a great deal of demagogy and downright ignorance is involved in presuming to speak for a whole religion or civilization. No, the West is the West, and Islam Islam.

Continue reading the entire article here.